National Council on Public History Putting History to Work in the World2016-02-10T00:33:13Z http://ncph.org/feed/atom/WordPress Cathy Stanton <![CDATA[Where in the world is the Public History Commons?]]> http://ncph.org/?p=15338 2016-02-10T00:00:16Z 2016-02-09T23:57:14Z Rockefeller Center Observation Deck. Photo credit: NVinacco

Rockefeller Center Observation Deck. Photo credit: NVinacco

If you’ve visited the website of the National Council on Public History lately, you’ll know that it’s been renovated and refreshed, with a brighter, cleaner look and (we hope) an easier-to-use design. Now it’s time for Phase II of the re-set, and since that involves the blog you’re reading—History@Work—and the space where it has lived until now—the Public History Commons—we wanted to explain what you can look for in the near future and some of the thinking that went into these changes. Read More

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Rockefeller Center Observation Deck. Photo credit: NVinacco

Rockefeller Center Observation Deck. Photo credit: NVinacco

If you’ve visited the website of the National Council on Public History lately, you’ll know that it’s been renovated and refreshed, with a brighter, cleaner look and (we hope) an easier-to-use design. Now it’s time for Phase II of the re-set, and since that involves the blog you’re reading—History@Work—and the space where it has lived until now—the Public History Commons—we wanted to explain what you can look for in the near future and some of the thinking that went into these changes.

First, both History@Work and the Public History Commons will be moving into the refurbished NCPH site. This reflects the organizational infrastructure behind what you see here, all of which is maintained and edited by NCPH volunteers and staff. Editorially, logistically, and financially, it makes much more sense to bring everything under one digital roof.

And second, we’ll be uncoupling History@Work and the Public History Commons. History@Work now has its own dedicated area within the NCPH site, while the Public History Commons will be moving into the “Publications & Resources” section where it can continue to serve as an area for discussion and experimentation as needed.

This may be confusing to people who think of the blog and the Commons as being one and the same. We’re hoping the new configuration will make their relationship and evolution a bit clearer.

Here’s the bullet-point version:

  • The Public History Commons (publichistorycommons.org) was always intended as a space where NCPH could incubate digital projects and enable more active exchange among public historians. When we created it in 2012, we decided to make it a stand-alone website because we needed to be more nimble and flexible than we were able to be within the old NCPH site. But it’s always been an NCPH project, and the move within ncph.org just reflects that more clearly.
  • One of the projects we’ve successfully incubated in the Commons is the History@Work blog, which built on the earlier NCPH blog called “Off the Wall.” Five years and more than 700 posts after our inaugural piece, History@Work seems established as a regular presence in the public history world and one of NCPH’s most active publications.
  • Other uses of the Commons that have proven successful are the now-annual posting of conference topic proposals (here’s the 2016 list), occasional public and private discussions by conference Working Groups and others (again, here’s an example from 2016), and the weekly posting of announcements about professional opportunities, which will continue under the updated heading of “Around the Field.”
  • Not all of our experiments in the Public History Commons have gotten traction. We experimented with creating an Omeka-based digital library where we could collect and share a wide variety of work relating to the field, but it has never really found its focus, and the materials we’ve gathered to date will be relocated shortly in the publications and resources area of the NCPH site.
  • We’ll also be letting go of the “Interest Sections” around which we originally structured History@Work. These categories initially helped us to think about ways to reach out to authors and readers from different areas of the field, but we’re finding them increasingly constricting in practice. We’ll be letting our tag taxonomy do the work of indexing our subject matter so that readers can zero in on posts of specific interest to them.

So History@Work has “graduated” from the Public History Commons and gone on to have its own area within the NCPH website, while the Commons itself will continue to exist as an as-needed resource for discussions and possible incubation of future projects.

We welcome your feedback in the comments below or via email at historyatwork@ncph.org, and we hope you’ll find this transition a smooth one!

~ Cathy Stanton is Digital Media Editor for the National Council on Public History.

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editors <![CDATA[Around the field Feb. 9, 2016]]> http://ncph.org/?p=15331 2016-02-09T23:32:18Z 2016-02-09T23:31:38Z newspaper-in-fieldFrom around the field this week: Born-digital and made-digital “frenemies”; summer study, travel, and preservation in Italy and filmmaking for historians (with free tuition) in Georgia, U.S.; funding and awards for archeologists, archivists, studies of U.S. Congress, and more.

CONFERENCES and CALLS

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newspaper-in-fieldFrom around the field this week: Born-digital and made-digital “frenemies”; summer study, travel, and preservation in Italy and filmmaking for historians (with free tuition) in Georgia, U.S.; funding and awards for archeologists, archivists, studies of U.S. Congress, and more.

CONFERENCES and CALLS

 

EVENTS and ANNOUNCEMENTS

  • British National Archives seeks input on developing services for academics and researchers (DEADLINE: Feb. 12, 2016)

 

FUNDING and AWARDS

 

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES

To submit an item to this weekly listing, email us at historyatworka[at]ncph.org. Please make sure to include a URL where readers can find more information about your posting.

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editors <![CDATA[Professional opportunities Jan. 26, 2016]]> http://ncph.org/?p=15245 2016-02-08T19:17:52Z 2016-02-08T02:04:06Z

newspaper-in-fieldFrom around the field this week: “Heavy heritage” in Istanbul, awards for unsung supporters of archives, window restoration boot camp, and more!

CONFERENCES and CALLS

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newspaper-in-fieldFrom around the field this week: “Heavy heritage” in Istanbul, awards for unsung supporters of archives, window restoration boot camp, and more!

CONFERENCES and CALLS

FUNDING and AWARDS

  • Public Humanities Fellowships from New York Council for the Humanities (DEADLINE: Feb. 12, 2016)
  • Society of American Archivists Spotlight Award recognizing the contributions of individuals who work for the good of the archives profession and of archival collections, and whose work would not typically receive public recognition (DEADLINE: Feb. 28, 2016)
  • The Charles Redd Center for Western Studies offers multiple awards for 2016 that are available for scholars conducting research related to Arizona, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Utah, or Wyoming. (DEADLINE: March 15)

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES

To submit an item to this weekly listing, email us at historyatwork[at]ncph.org. Please make sure to include a URL where readers can find more information about your posting.

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Joan Zenzen <![CDATA[National Park Service history webinars: A short survey]]> http://ncph.org/?p=15333 2016-02-09T23:45:48Z 2016-02-02T13:30:13Z This exhibit from the Chancellorsville Visitor Center at Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania National Military Park imagines how historical documentation can inform interpretation of the Civil War. Photo credit: Joan M. Zenzen

This exhibit from the Chancellorsville Visitor Center at Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania National Military Park imagines how historical documentation can inform interpretation of the Civil War. Photo credit: Joan M. Zenzen

The Organization of American Historians Committee on National Park Service Collaboration is hosting a short survey to determine interest in developing a series of webinars. Read More

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This exhibit from the Chancellorsville Visitor Center at Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania National Military Park imagines how historical documentation can inform interpretation of the Civil War. Photo credit: Joan M. Zenzen

This exhibit from the Chancellorsville Visitor Center at Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania National Military Park imagines how historical documentation can inform interpretation of the Civil War. Photo credit: Joan M. Zenzen

The Organization of American Historians Committee on National Park Service Collaboration is hosting a short survey to determine interest in developing a series of webinars. These webinars would address a perceived need for information about NPS and its history with respect to such topics as contracting, job pursuits, and research and writing. Based upon the responses, the OAH Committee will work with qualified individuals within NPS and others from academic and/or public spheres to offer one or more relevant webinars.

The OAH-NPS Collaboration Committee promotes NPS within the professional organization. The OAH and NPS have a long-time cooperative agreement, which has facilitated a range of work, from academic site visits to administrative histories. Former NPS Chief Historian Dwight Pitcaithley pursued such an agreement as a way to strengthen interpretation and historical work at NPS sites.

Please follow this link to take the survey:

https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/BZFNRRS

The survey will be live through Sunday, February 14.

The Committee looks forward to reviewing your responses.

~ Joan M. Zenzen is an independent public historian who has written administrative histories of various national park sites, including four battlefield parks. She chairs the OAH Committee on NPS Collaboration. You can reach her at joanz10@verizon.net

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David Rotenstein <![CDATA[A public history role for building bike lanes in cities?]]> http://ncph.org/?p=15247 2016-02-09T23:39:23Z 2016-01-28T13:30:40Z
L Street NW cycle track, Washington, DC. Photo credit: David Rotenstein

L Street NW cycle track, Washington, DC. Photo credit: David Rotenstein

Gentrification: It’s not just for sociologists and anthropologists any more. Though historians have been making inroads documenting and interpreting gentrification and displacement, there are abundant opportunities for historians to make significant contributions in public policy and planning.

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L Street NW cycle track, Washington, DC. Photo credit: David Rotenstein

L Street NW cycle track, Washington, DC. Photo credit: David Rotenstein

Gentrification: It’s not just for sociologists and anthropologists any more. Though historians have been making inroads documenting and interpreting gentrification and displacement, there are abundant opportunities for historians to make significant contributions in public policy and planning. One recent kerfuffle involving proposed bicycle lanes and African American churches in Washington, DC, provides a window into how a better understanding of the past could have defused a racially and class charged debate over painted lines in public spaces.

I was attracted to the bike lanes issue for a number of reasons. First, it goes directly to the deleterious effects of ignoring and erasing history–something I’ve written about several times for History@Work. The bike lanes dustup also raises important questions about the roles that privilege plays in public policy and what happens when privilege based upon race and/or class blinds stakeholders to different points of view. I’m also a cyclist.

In October 2015, the District of Columbia Department of Transportation convened a public meeting to discuss alternatives for bike lanes through the city’s Shaw neighborhood. Shaw, like other DC neighborhoods, is undergoing gentrification after decades of disinvestment and municipal neglect. It’s a part of the city that has a rich and storied history because of the African Americans who lived, worked, played, and worshipped there throughout much of the twentieth century. The well-known U Street corridor–known as Washington’s Harlem–bisects the neighborhood from west to east, and it’s home to Howard University. Shaw was named for Civil War Colonel Robert Gould Shaw, commander of the 54th Massachusetts regiment memorialized in the 1989 movie, Glory.

There is an unbroken thread of displaced African Americans moving into Shaw. It starts with Civil War-era contraband camps; continues with people displaced by gentrification in Georgetown in the 1920s and 1930s and families unable to find homes in neighborhoods with racially restrictive covenants; and, households displaced by urban renewal after World War II. Decline in Shaw began with black flight to the suburbs after landmark civil rights laws and court cases. The neighborhood was devastated in the civil unrest that erupted after Martin Luther King, Jr. was assassinated in 1968. It was exacerbated by cut-and-cover Metro construction in the 1980s and crack cocaine’s decade-long hold over the streets and people there.

Despite a wide array of public and private sector efforts to infuse money and people, Shaw languished in poverty until the turn of the twenty-first century. A convergence of economic and public policy shifts in Washington jump-started new residential and commercial investments that began attracting mostly white millennials to the District’s rehabilitating slums. The influx of new investments and new people kicked off new direct displacement pressures–higher property taxes, high rents, and fewer options for housing and commercial space–as police protection and public services improved and new amenities like bike lanes appeared.

Indirect displacement–social and cultural displacement–also occurred. These are changes represented by new people starting to outnumber longtime residents (social) and the increasing dominance of new cultural rhythms and spatial uses that replace existing ones (cultural). These indirect displacement pressures occur in a context where physical displacement has occurred for more than a century. In some respects, even if people don’t succumb to the economic pressures that push people out of neighborhoods, Washington’s long history of public- and private-sector displacement is never far from longtime residents’ minds.

New Bethel Baptist Church. Photo by the author.

New Bethel Baptist Church. Photo credit: David Rotenstein

It is that history to which Pastor Dexter Nutall refers in an interview with me done at New Bethel Baptist Church, where he has been lead pastor since 2009. It’s the same pulpit that had been occupied for 50 years by DC Home Rule advocate and former Congressional Delegate Rev. Walter Fauntroy. Nutall explained that his congregants have been increasingly marginalized from public policy decisions related to development in the neighborhood. “The manner in which it has been done has been in disregard of the interests of the whole,” he said. “When you come into a space that has not only been occupied but preserved, protected, maintained by a party like a church, it is not only unwise but it’s offensive because there is no regard for the history.”

Nutall’s church is one of a handful of other African American churches in the Ninth and Sixth streets corridors in Washington’s Northwest quadrant that would be directly impacted by bike lanes. Nutall and other church leaders say the bike lanes would prevent the diagonal parking that the city permits Sundays. It would, as pastors and residents said in the October public meeting, create hardships for congregants who rely on cars and nearby parking to be able to attend church. One church, the United House of Prayer, hired an attorney and alleges its religious freedoms are being violated.

Washington Post reporter Perry Stein observed in a November 2015 article on gentrification and bike lanes that Washington is one of several cities across the nation where conflict has erupted over bike lanes in gentrifying neighborhoods. For the nation’s capital, the 2015 fight appeared to be a rerun of one from 2013 when District officials proposed building a protected bike track along L Street NW in the same block as a historic African Methodist Episcopal (AME) church. Anthropologist and cycling equity consultant Adonia Lugo told Stein that one issue among African Americans is how bicycles are perceived as symbols of anachronistic poverty or middle-class elitism. Cars, however, are an equalizing artifact among many African Americans, enabling suburban relocation and affording freedom to return to old urban neighborhoods with strong place attachment.

Sunday parking sign, Galbraith A.M.E. Zion Church, Sixth Street NW, Washington, D.C. Photo by the author.

Sunday parking sign, Galbraith AME Zion Church, Sixth Street NW, Washington, DC. Photo credit: David Rotenstein

The cycling enthusiasts and urbanists pushing for the bike lanes assert that the new infrastructure is necessary for safety. They dismiss the claims from longtime Shaw residents that the bike lanes are related to gentrification and that the bike lanes would be harmful.

Many bike lane proponents echo claims made by the writers and editors of Greater Greater Washington, a local blog that focuses on transportation and development in the region. The GGW community (disclosure: I occasionally write for GGW) asserts that the bike lanes can have no negative impacts and that they’ll only improve the neighborhoods through which the lanes run and those they connect to.

Some GGW writers and readers cannot see beyond the painted lines, bicycles, and cars into the historical basis for concern.  Bike lanes are an appropriation of public space that further marginalizes neighborhood residents who are being physically and symbolically displaced.[1] For Nutall, a 46-year-old native Washingtonian and lifelong church member, and some of the others who came out to oppose the proposed bike lanes, it’s really not about bicycles or their lanes. It’s about a seat at the table and displacement in all its forms. “What I’m interested in is the opportunity for us stakeholders who have protected, preserved, maintained these communities–that everybody all of a sudden has this interest in–that they have an opportunity to participate,” Nutall told me.

Can public history inform contested dialogues like the ones over bike lanes in gentrifying neighborhoods? I believe it can because it brings to the discussion not just historical depth but also engagement tools that could resolve debates in a productive and equitable solution for all.

David Rotenstein is a consulting historian based in Silver Spring, Maryland. He researches and writes on historic preservation, industrial history, and gentrification.

[1] The typical GGW position may be seen in this comment I received from a GGW contributor, quoted here with his permission: “I actually find the whole subtext of oppression and displacement in this debate a bit offensive, because there is real oppression and real displacement that goes on. Wrapping themselves in the victimhood of these real offenses for a case that simply doesn’t qualify as one, detracts from this debate and from the severity of those cases.” This contributor and other bike lane proponents–most of whom are white, middle-class newcomers to Washington or residents in neighboring jurisdictions–don’t appear to understand displacement’s subtleties and complexities, nor do they appear to grasp Washington’s longtime struggles with displacement.

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editors <![CDATA[Professional opportunities Jan. 19, 2016]]> http://publichistorycommons.org/?p=9831 2016-01-20T01:01:52Z 2016-01-20T01:01:52Z newspaper-in-fieldFrom around the field this week: Conference calls for nursing/healthcare history, African-American museums and genealogy, the future of urban preservationism, plus awards for archivists and their advocates.

NOTE: This weekly listing of items of possible interest to practicing public historians will now appear as a regular blog post on History@Work rather than in the “News” sidebar as previously. Read More

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newspaper-in-fieldFrom around the field this week: Conference calls for nursing/healthcare history, African-American museums and genealogy, the future of urban preservationism, plus awards for archivists and their advocates.

NOTE: This weekly listing of items of possible interest to practicing public historians will now appear as a regular blog post on History@Work rather than in the “News” sidebar as previously. Watch for the whole publichistorycommons.org site to make a move into the National Council on Public History website soon!

CONFERENCES and CALLS

FUNDING and AWARDS

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES

To submit an item to the weekly PH Announce listing, email us at news[at]publichistorycommons.org. Please make sure to include a URL where readers can find more information about your posting.

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editors <![CDATA[Ask a Public Historian Q&A: Nicole Belle DeRise]]> http://publichistorycommons.org/?p=9799 2016-01-14T17:14:12Z 2016-01-14T17:14:12Z Interior of workbook.|Courtesy: Nicole Belle DeRise

Photo credit: Nicole Belle DeRise

This is the second in a new series “Ask a Public Historian,” brought to you by the National Council for Public History New Professional and Graduate Student Committee.

Nicole Belle DeRise is a Historian with the Wells Fargo Family & Business History Center. Read More

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Interior of workbook.|Courtesy: Nicole Belle DeRise

Photo credit: Nicole Belle DeRise

This is the second in a new series “Ask a Public Historian,” brought to you by the National Council for Public History New Professional and Graduate Student Committee.

Nicole Belle DeRise is a Historian with the Wells Fargo Family & Business History Center. Prior to joining Wells Fargo, she was the Program Manager of Brooklyn Connections, an educational outreach program at the Brooklyn Public Library. Nicole has an MA in Public History from New York University’s Graduate School of Arts and Science and a BA in History and Italian from University of Massachusetts Amherst. She lives in Queens, NY.

What was your career trajectory?

After I graduated with an MA in Public History, I got my “dream job” at a great museum. Unfortunately, within two months, the museum was shut down due to funding, and I was laid off.

I spent six months trying to find other opportunities in museums/cultural institutions/libraries; having no luck, I decided to scrap the whole public history thing and went to go work at an advertising agency. Through this experience, I learned the importance of content, storytelling, and creative thinking, and just how applicable they are in public history. Maybe more importantly, I came to understand that as a public historian, I had to effectively communicate and “sell” what it was that I do. I love history but that doesn’t mean other people will.

About a year into my advertising job, the Brooklyn Public Library (BPL) approached me regarding a position. Knowing that advertising wasn’t where I wanted to be, and having reclaimed my passion for history, I took a job as the Program Manager for Brooklyn Connections–the education outreach program that’s part of the Brooklyn Collection, the local history archive at BPL. I worked with students, educators, and administrators to effectively use primary source material and archival collections in the classroom.

While I was enjoying that opportunity, I heard about my current position at the Wells Fargo Family & Business History Center and couldn’t pass it up. The job’s focus is on using family history as both a client relationship builder and a business development tool. I have always had a passion for family history and found the idea of using history as part of a business strategy married my previous experience in a way I had to explore. I have been with Wells Fargo now for 2 ½ years and absolutely love it.

Who is the “public” in your position? How do you engage them?

The clients and prospective clients of the bank are my “public.” We engage via a formal presentation of an archive consisting of primary and secondary source material documenting their family’s history. The in-person presentation is akin to a museum exhibit–all of the records are professionally printed, annotated, and laid out for the family. Using the specific primary source material relating to their family, we are able to discuss the broad and often complicated histories that surround their story. Being able to work one-on-one with clients is such a wonderful honor for a public historian as a true dialogue can emerge in an intimate setting of a family history presentation.

What was your favorite project?

Workbook cover.| Courtesy of: Nicole Belle DeRise

Workbook cover. Photo credit: Nicole Belle DeRise.

I have two! The first was writing and producing a workbook for kids. Aimed at 6- to 11-year olds, it is a primer on the basics of family history, encouraging children to ask the questions, “What is it?” and “How does it pertain to me?” It is also a place where kids can start recording their own family history and engage with their family in the process.

My second favorite project has been producing family history documentaries for our clients. Working with a filmmaker, we make bespoke films anywhere from five minutes to a few hours long recounting the family’s history. While the documentaries don’t take the place of our one-on-one meetings, they are another dimension of the work and are designed to be shareable, our goal being to connect with more family members beyond the in-person presentation.

Image courtesy of Nicole Belle Derise.

Workbook. Photo credit: Nicole Belle DeRise

What advice can you give to people to successfully apply for a position in a corporation?

Working for a corporation, especially a bank, is very different than working for a non-profit. Researching a prospective employer is paramount. Learning about the corporate culture and what their mission is can be incredibly helpful when interviewing. Think about questions like–What is important to the company? Is it their clients? Their product? How does this job/department fit into the greater organization?

After you understand that, think about what it is that you bring to the table that can augment their mission as well as how you are going to work collaboratively with people who are not historians. Be able to explain how you are going to translate what you do to non-historian colleagues.

Finally, look the part. Jeans and a t-shirt don’t work in corporate America. Invest in a nice business casual wardrobe, and, remember, it’s all a sales game.

What are the top pros and cons of working for a corporation?

Pros–flexibility, support, and higher earning potential. We are given a lot of latitude and backing for our projects and are encouraged to try different things in order to best serve our clients.

Cons–our job within the bank is so unique and perhaps not well understood either inside the corporation or out.

Any good resume tips specific to your field?

Tailor your cover letter and resume to the job to which you are applying. Not necessarily specific to working as a historian at a bank/corporation but make sure you spell check. Seriously. Be consistent in whatever style you use on your resume and try and keep it to one page. Always get somebody else to take another look at it for you.

Any other advice for folks on the public history job search?

Be honest with yourself and with prospective employers. Do your research on where you are applying to and make sure it aligns with what you are interested in. Take the time to assess if you like the people and the position. Interviews should be a two-way conversation. Do not be afraid to ask questions. This is both a time for an employer to determine if you’re best for the job and for you to decide if you want the job. A very smart boss used to say, “You don’t go to work to fail, you go to work to succeed,” so make sure you are setting yourself up to do just that.

~ Follow the NCPH New Professional and Graduate Student Committee on Twitter at @NCPHnewgrad

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Cathy Stanton <![CDATA[The News Feed is moving to the main blog]]> http://publichistorycommons.org/?p=9770 2016-01-13T13:39:19Z 2016-01-13T13:39:19Z As we’re preparing to move the contents of the publichistorycommons.org site into the main National Council on Public History website in the next couple of weeks, we’re making some changes to the place of the News Feed within the overall site. Read More

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As we’re preparing to move the contents of the publichistorycommons.org site into the main National Council on Public History website in the next couple of weeks, we’re making some changes to the place of the News Feed within the overall site.

For the past three years, the weekly posting of news items has appeared in this sidebar space. Starting today, it will appear as a full blog post in the History@Work blog, with a new format that we hope is slightly friendlier to peruse.

Check out today’s news post, and be sure to keep an eye out for further changes coming soon.

As always, all of the contents of this news posting, along with other newsy items about the world of public history, a link to our job and internship postings, and announcements about NCPH activities are included in the Public History News Update that is emailed to all NCPH members weekly. You can access all of these various pieces elsewhere, but a benefit of membership in the organization is that they arrive neatly bundled in your inbox every week!

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editors <![CDATA[Professional Opportunities Jan. 13, 2016]]> http://publichistorycommons.org/?p=9758 2016-01-13T13:31:22Z 2016-01-13T13:31:22Z newspaper-in-fieldFrom around the field this week: extended deadline for international award for technology exhibits, a chance to weigh in on women’s history scholarship at the U.S. National Women’s History Museum, and more.

NOTE: This weekly listing of items of possible interest to practicing public historians will now appear as a regular blog post on History@Work rather than in the “News” sidebar as previously. Read More

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newspaper-in-fieldFrom around the field this week: extended deadline for international award for technology exhibits, a chance to weigh in on women’s history scholarship at the U.S. National Women’s History Museum, and more.

NOTE: This weekly listing of items of possible interest to practicing public historians will now appear as a regular blog post on History@Work rather than in the “News” sidebar as previously. Watch for the whole publichistorycommons.org site to make a move into the National Council on Public History website in the next couple of weeks!

CONFERENCES and CALLS

  • Museum and Exhibition (MUSE) Studies program at University of Illinois at Chicago seeks submissions for an upcoming publication analyzing, critiquing, and space making for new thinking about museums and exhibitions (DEADLINE: Feb. 1, 2016 – learn more on Facebook event page)
  • Summer Seminar in History and Statecraft at the Clements Center for National Security – July 24-29, 2016, Beaver Creek, Colorado, U.S. (DEADLINE: Feb. 15, 2016)
  • The Archaeology Channel Conference on Cultural Heritage Media – May 11-15, 2016, Eugene, Oregon, U.S. (DEADLINE EXTENDED: Feb. 29, 2016)
  • Screening New England: 100 Years of Regional Moving Image History, 17th Annual Northeast Historic Film Summer Symposium – July 21-23, 2016, Bucksport, Maine, U.S. (DEADLINE: April 19, 2016)
  • Call for Peer Reviewers for Museological Review issue “The Global Microphone” – contact Museologicalreview@leicester.ac.uk

EVENTS

FUNDING and AWARDS

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES

PUBLICATIONS and REVIEWS

To submit an item to the weekly PH Announce listing, email us at news[at]publichistorycommons.org. Please make sure to include a URL where readers can find more information about your posting.

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editors <![CDATA[Professional opportunities Jan. 6, 2016]]> http://publichistorycommons.org/?p=9540 2016-01-06T14:02:16Z 2016-01-06T14:02:16Z To submit an item for the News Feed, send an email to: news[at]publichistorycommons.org

CFP:Oral Narratives and the Politics of History Making” International Oral History Conference – Dec. 6-8, 2016, Jerusalem, Israel
DEADLINE: March 15, 2016

EDU: The Association for Documentary Editing (ADE) welcomes applications for the 2016 Institute for the Editing of Historical Documents – July 31-August 4, 2016, New Orleans, Louisiana, U.S. Read More

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To submit an item for the News Feed, send an email to: news[at]publichistorycommons.org

CFP:Oral Narratives and the Politics of History Making” International Oral History Conference – Dec. 6-8, 2016, Jerusalem, Israel
DEADLINE: March 15, 2016

EDU: The Association for Documentary Editing (ADE) welcomes applications for the 2016 Institute for the Editing of Historical Documents – July 31-August 4, 2016, New Orleans, Louisiana, U.S.
DEADLINE: February 1, 2016

EDU: LYRASIS classes in sustainable preservation, introduction to digital imaging, disaster preparedness, and more

EDU: Three day workshop on Preservation of Digitally Printed Materials in Libraries, Archives, and Museums (Free) – Oct. 25-27, 2016, Rochester, New York, U.S.
APPLICATION DEADLINE: March 31, 2016

To submit an item for the News Feed, send an email to: news[at]publichistorycommons.org

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