Tag Archive

gender/sexuality

Bachelor Girls or Perverts?: Teaching Histories of Sexuality in Public History Courses

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In her 1903 work Social Culture, Annie Randall White encouraged unmarried women over the age of thirty to form domestic partnerships with each other: “Many of our ‘bachelor girls’ live together and are the happiest people imaginable.” [1]

Annie Randall White, Social Culture: An Up-to-Date Book for Polite Society, Containing Rules for Conduct in Public, Social and Private Life, at Home and Abroad [S.l: s.n.], 1903, Josephine Long Wishart Collection: Mother, Home, and Heaven, Special Collections Library, The College of Wooster, Wooster, Ohio.

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Make queerness relevant again

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Poster for Sporter's, one of Boston's earliest gay bars, c. 1960s. Photo credit: The William Conrad Collection, The History Project, Boston.

Poster for Sporter’s, one of Boston’s earliest gay bars, c. 1960s.  Image credit: William Conrad Collection, The History Project, Boston.

Editor’s Note: This is the first of a series of posts reflecting on Gregory Rosenthal’s article, “Make Roanoke Queer Again: Community History and Urban Change in a Southern City,” published in the February 2017 issue of The Public Historian, and on how the Roanoke project relates to other LGBTQ public history projects. Read More

NCPH Book Award: Reflections from Susan Ferentinos

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Interpreting LGBT History at Museums and Historic Sites (Rowman & Littlefield) Cover shot courtesy the author

Interpreting LGBT History at Museums and Historic Sites (Rowman & Littlefield) Cover.

I decided to become a professional historian in a campground in Ohio in the summer of 1994. I was spending the day lounging at my campsite, reading About Time: Exploring the Gay Past, by Martin Duberman, when his essay “’Writhing Bedfellows’ in Antebellum South Carolina: Historical Interpretation and the Politics of Evidence” got me so fired up that I decided it was time to go out and do what I could to bring the past to the people. Read More

Jack the Ripper Museum

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In August 2015, a museum that had originally been billed as “the first women’s museum in the UK” opened instead as the Jack the Ripper Museum on Cable Street in the East End of London. ‘Jack the Ripper,’ an anonymous figure who murdered and mutilated at least five women in the late nineteenth century, has become the focus of a museum that had once been promised to represent and celebrate untold histories of women. Read More