Tag Archive


Project Showcase: Still Fighting For Our Lives

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Still Fighting For Our Lives uses artifacts of multiple mediums to highlight the central role that visual culture has played in Philadelphia’s HIV/AIDS history. Photo credit: GVGK Tang

Still Fighting For Our Lives, an exhibition sponsored and hosted by the William Way LGBT Community Center, commemorates the thirtieth anniversary of the Philadelphia AIDS Library. Read More

Documenting resilience and community healing in Orlando

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Bennett Barthelemy taking a photograph of memorial in front of Pulse Nightclub. Photo credit: Melissa Barthelemy.

In June, my brother and I traveled from Santa Barbara, California to Orlando, Florida to help document the one-year remembrance events and exhibitions honoring the victims, survivors, and all those affected by the Pulse Nightclub shooting. Read More

Bachelor Girls or Perverts?: Teaching Histories of Sexuality in Public History Courses

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In her 1903 work Social Culture, Annie Randall White encouraged unmarried women over the age of thirty to form domestic partnerships with each other: “Many of our ‘bachelor girls’ live together and are the happiest people imaginable.” [1]

Annie Randall White, Social Culture: An Up-to-Date Book for Polite Society, Containing Rules for Conduct in Public, Social and Private Life, at Home and Abroad [S.l: s.n.], 1903, Josephine Long Wishart Collection: Mother, Home, and Heaven, Special Collections Library, The College of Wooster, Wooster, Ohio.

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Make queerness relevant again

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Poster for Sporter's, one of Boston's earliest gay bars, c. 1960s. Photo credit: The William Conrad Collection, The History Project, Boston.

Poster for Sporter’s, one of Boston’s earliest gay bars, c. 1960s.  Image credit: William Conrad Collection, The History Project, Boston.

Editor’s Note: This is the first of a series of posts reflecting on Gregory Rosenthal’s article, “Make Roanoke Queer Again: Community History and Urban Change in a Southern City,” published in the February 2017 issue of The Public Historian, and on how the Roanoke project relates to other LGBTQ public history projects. Read More