Tag Archive

human rights

A response to the election

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March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, August 28, 1963. Photo credit: National Archives.

March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, August 28, 1963. Photo credit: National Archives.

How should public historians respond to the new reality of the incoming political leadership in the United States? Representative democracy in the United States has survived the bitter partisanship of the Early Republic, the Civil War, corruption and scandals, the rise of international fascism, and the paroxysms of protest against the Vietnam War, so it is likely to endure. Read More

Welcome to America: Embracing public history as public education

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International Academy students at Iroquois High School in Louisville, Kentucky.

International Academy students work in Donna Neary’s classroom at Iroquois High School in Louisville, Kentucky. Photo credit: Donna Neary

My transition from public history to teaching was unplanned. After twenty-five years of working for local, state and federal governments, museums, non-profits, and as a consultant, I was unemployed, cut loose, and drifting out of sight of the public history mother ship. Read More

Hardball history: Knowing the people's history requires being on their side

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Project narrator David Campbell explains to the media in August 2002 why he will not leave his encampment, known as Camelot, while the city bulldozers wait to move in. Photo credit: Steve Cagan. Used with permission from the collection of the Northeast Ohio Coalition for the Homeless.

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Hardball history: Choosing sides

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Banners telling the stories of particular El Paso buildings were the first iteration of the Museo Urbano project. Photo credit: Bruce Berman

Hardball history that places historians at the center of politics, advocacy, and activism can be a difficult journey, but it can also be inspiring. Read More

History without vision: A struggle over art at the City Museum of New York

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Mike Alewitz's "The City at the Crossroads of History" mural was commissioned for the City Museum of New York, which has declined to display it.

Mike Alewitz’s “The City at the Crossroads of History” mural was commissioned for the City Museum of New York, which has declined to display it. Photo credit: Mike Alewitz

Muralist and activist Mike Alewitz has finished his tribute to the labor and social justice movements, an imposing four-panel painting titled The City at the Crossroads of History–but the museum it was commissioned for doesn’t want it. Read More