Tag Archive

methods

Reflecting on the first NCPH “extraordinary service” award

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Cathy Stanton leads the NCPH’s Digital Media Group in Nashville in 2015. Photo credit: Amy Tyson

Editor’s note: this is the second in a series of pieces by recipients of NCPH’s 2018 best in public history awards.

On learning that I would be receiving an award for “extraordinary service” to the National Council on Public History, my initial response was to point out that the projects I’ve been involved in have always been group efforts by staff and many other NCPH members. Read More

Roanoke made me queer again

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Editor’s note: this is the first in a series of pieces by recipients of NCPH’s 2018 best in public history awards.

The Southwest Virginia LGBTQ+ History Project hosts an intergenerational story circle focused on “Lesbian Herstory” with members of First Friday, a 1980s-era lesbian organization, at Roanoke’s Pride in the Park festival, April 15, 2018.

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Our Marathon, five years later: Reflections on the work of digital public humanities

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A boy signs a Boston Marathon poster at the Boylston Street firehouse, April 2013. Photo credit: James Schmidt.

Five years ago I was watching the Boston Marathon in Coolidge Corner with my brother Brian. He had recently moved to the city and had never experienced a Marathon Monday, so the lively spectators and runners in Brookline—combined with the perfect spring weather—seemed like a fine introduction to this Boston tradition. Read More

International Family History Workshop, Part I

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Alison Light speaks with attendees of the International Family History Workshop. Photo credit: Tanya Evans

The study and practice of family history is fraught with methodological, historiographical, practical, ethical, and cultural concerns for scholars and practitioners alike.[1] In trying to design an event that might respond to and interrogate these concerns, we asked: What new knowledge might be created if we bring scholars together to discuss the phenomenal growth of family history in different nations? Read More

Bachelor Girls or Perverts?: Teaching Histories of Sexuality in Public History Courses

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In her 1903 work Social Culture, Annie Randall White encouraged unmarried women over the age of thirty to form domestic partnerships with each other: “Many of our ‘bachelor girls’ live together and are the happiest people imaginable.” [1]

Annie Randall White, Social Culture: An Up-to-Date Book for Polite Society, Containing Rules for Conduct in Public, Social and Private Life, at Home and Abroad [S.l: s.n.], 1903, Josephine Long Wishart Collection: Mother, Home, and Heaven, Special Collections Library, The College of Wooster, Wooster, Ohio.

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