Tag Archive

race

My community’s history is racist. How can I correct it?

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Silver Spring “Memory Wall” mural depicting the B&O Railroad station, c. 1940s. Photo credit: David Rotenstein.

This is an exciting and anxiety-producing moment in the United States. It is a time when professional historians are stepping outside their classrooms and consulting practices to push for the removal of Confederate statues and for greater public dialogue about the roles that white supremacy played in the past and how it persists in our communities. Read More

Teachable moments: Lessons to take to heart

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A teachable moment at the 2017 AAM Conference

Early Tweet about controversial figures at the AAM 2017 conference. Screenshot used with permission of @Their_Child

In walking through the expo hall at the American Alliance of Museums (AAM) conference in May, a friend of mine and I came upon one of the vendor displays that showed the figure of an enslaved black man shackled to a pole and a grey (white) auctioneer figure standing as if to accept bids. Read More

Public art and history: Silver Spring’s Memory Wall

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The Silver Spring Memory Wall was completed on the exterior wall of a Caldor department store. Photo credit: David Rotenstein.

In the 1990s, Silver Spring, Maryland, was desperate for economic investment and an image makeover. Next door to Washington, D.C., the Montgomery County suburb had suffered from two decades of disinvestment and white flight. Read More

Listening to witnesses: The evolving history of Hobcaw Barony

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Minnie Kennedy’s sister Nettie and her groom, Rainey Gardner, on their way to be married at Friendfield Church on Hobcaw Barony sometime in the 1920s. Photographer unknown. Photo credit: Belle W. Baruch Foundation.

For the last five years, South Carolina ETV, the state’s public television network, has been experimenting with ways to tell the story of a 16,000-acre undeveloped property called Hobcaw Barony. Read More

Inclusive training at Historic Columbia

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The Wilson family constructed the Woodrow Wilson Family Home in Columbia, South Carolina during Reconstruction but only lived in the community for four years. Photo credit: Historic Columbia.

Believed to be the first museum of Reconstruction in the nation, the Woodrow Wilson Family Home (WWFH) reopened to the public on February 15, 2014 after being closed for nine years. Read More