Tag Archive

race

Public art and history: Silver Spring’s Memory Wall

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The Silver Spring Memory Wall was completed on the exterior wall of a Caldor department store. Photo credit: David Rotenstein.

In the 1990s, Silver Spring, Maryland, was desperate for economic investment and an image makeover. Next door to Washington, D.C., the Montgomery County suburb had suffered from two decades of disinvestment and white flight. Read More

Listening to witnesses: The evolving history of Hobcaw Barony

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Minnie Kennedy’s sister Nettie and her groom, Rainey Gardner, on their way to be married at Friendfield Church on Hobcaw Barony sometime in the 1920s. Photographer unknown. Photo credit: Belle W. Baruch Foundation.

For the last five years, South Carolina ETV, the state’s public television network, has been experimenting with ways to tell the story of a 16,000-acre undeveloped property called Hobcaw Barony. Read More

Inclusive training at Historic Columbia

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The Wilson family constructed the Woodrow Wilson Family Home in Columbia, South Carolina during Reconstruction but only lived in the community for four years. Photo credit: Historic Columbia.

Believed to be the first museum of Reconstruction in the nation, the Woodrow Wilson Family Home (WWFH) reopened to the public on February 15, 2014 after being closed for nine years. Read More

Top five posts of 2016

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reed-hamilton-screen-shotAs we mark the end of a tumultuous 2016 and begin what promises to be an eventful new year, [email protected]’s editors are reflecting on the posts that prompted the widest readership and dialogue among our community:

Annette Gordon Reed, Hamilton the Musical: Blacks and the Founding Fathers

Matthew Exline, Looking for a Job in Public History: An Outsider’s Perspective

Cathy Stanton, Does the National Park Service have a Culture Problem? Read More

A response to the election

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March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, August 28, 1963. Photo credit: National Archives.

March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, August 28, 1963. Photo credit: National Archives.

How should public historians respond to the new reality of the incoming political leadership in the United States? Representative democracy in the United States has survived the bitter partisanship of the Early Republic, the Civil War, corruption and scandals, the rise of international fascism, and the paroxysms of protest against the Vietnam War, so it is likely to endure. Read More

Standing Rock and Sitting Bull: Where is the history?

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A gathering at the Dakota Access Pipeline blockate in Cannonball, North Dakota, August 15, 2016. Photo credit: Shane Balkowitsch

A gathering at the Dakota Access Pipeline blockade in Cannonball, North Dakota, August 15, 2016. Photo credit: Shane Balkowitsch

As I’ve watched the groundswell of protest at the Standing Rock reservation in North Dakota over the building of a new pipeline carrying “fracked” oil from the massive Bakken oilfield, I’ve been surprised by the lack of mention of what seems to me to be one of the most striking things about this action: the fact that it’s taking place on the same reservation where Sitting Bull was killed in December 1890 by federal Indian agency police who came to arrest him as part of an attempt to suppress a wave of Indian resistance. Read More

Public history and public activism at work: Washington’s McMillan Sand Filtration Site

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04July-TweetOn July 4, about 60 people attended a party thrown by Washington, DC activists trying to save a historic water filtration plant. The event was held in a row house in the city’s gentrifying Bloomingdale neighborhood, which I wrote about in a recent [email protected] post. Read More