Tag Archive

social justice

Disrupting authority: The radical roots and branches of oral history

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William Colbert of Alabama, ca. 1936. Born in slavery, Colbert was interviewed by the Federal Writers’ Project. Photo credit: Library of Congress

Oral history, like public history, is now old enough to have its own history, its own founding narrative. As one might expect from a field so deeply devoted to challenging incomplete and exclusive narratives, oral historians are now asking what is left out of their own history and filling in some of the gaps they have found. Read More

Top five posts of 2016

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reed-hamilton-screen-shotAs we mark the end of a tumultuous 2016 and begin what promises to be an eventful new year, [email protected]’s editors are reflecting on the posts that prompted the widest readership and dialogue among our community:

Annette Gordon Reed, Hamilton the Musical: Blacks and the Founding Fathers

Matthew Exline, Looking for a Job in Public History: An Outsider’s Perspective

Cathy Stanton, Does the National Park Service have a Culture Problem? Read More

A response to the election

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March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, August 28, 1963. Photo credit: National Archives.

March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, August 28, 1963. Photo credit: National Archives.

How should public historians respond to the new reality of the incoming political leadership in the United States? Representative democracy in the United States has survived the bitter partisanship of the Early Republic, the Civil War, corruption and scandals, the rise of international fascism, and the paroxysms of protest against the Vietnam War, so it is likely to endure. Read More

Standing Rock and Sitting Bull: Where is the history?

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A gathering at the Dakota Access Pipeline blockate in Cannonball, North Dakota, August 15, 2016. Photo credit: Shane Balkowitsch

A gathering at the Dakota Access Pipeline blockade in Cannonball, North Dakota, August 15, 2016. Photo credit: Shane Balkowitsch

As I’ve watched the groundswell of protest at the Standing Rock reservation in North Dakota over the building of a new pipeline carrying “fracked” oil from the massive Bakken oilfield, I’ve been surprised by the lack of mention of what seems to me to be one of the most striking things about this action: the fact that it’s taking place on the same reservation where Sitting Bull was killed in December 1890 by federal Indian agency police who came to arrest him as part of an attempt to suppress a wave of Indian resistance. Read More

Project Showcase: A Tribute to the Mother Emanuel Church

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Mother Emanuel Photo

Memorabilia left outside of the Emanuel AME Church. Photo credit: Brandon Coffey

June 17, 2016 marked the one-year anniversary of the tragic mass shooting at the Emanuel AME Church, also known as Mother Emanuel, in Charleston, South Carolina. A new online exhibition published by the Lowcountry Digital History Initiative (LDHI), “A Tribute to the Mother Emanuel Church,” documents the outpouring of emotion and grief for the victims, survivors, and their families. Read More

Project Showcase: Forty Blocks: The East Garfield Park Oral History Project

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Film Crew photo

Breakthrough’s Film Crew students and adult mentors, along with staff from the Studs Terkel Center for Oral History. Photo Credit: Chicago History Museum

The Chicago History Museum (CHM) and Breakthrough, a community-based organization that provides social services on Chicago’s West Side, have launched Forty Blocks: The East Garfield Park Oral History Project. Read More

The public history of the Flint water crisis (Part 1)

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Beach-Garland St-Flint River Bridge, Flint, MI, July 2010. Photo credit: Andrew Jameson

Environmental Racism and Lead Poisoning in Flint

I study environmental justice movements, both contemporary and historical. Lead (along with asthma) has been a central urban environmental health issue in the US that hits racial minorities and working-class people particularly hard. Read More