Tag Archive

TPH 39.4

Industrial heritage as agent of gentrification

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Editor’s note: This is the final post in a series on deindustrialization and industrial heritage commissioned by “The Public Historian,” expanding the conversation begun with the November 2017 special issue on the topic.

The former Redpath Sugar Foundry in Point Saint-Charles is now a condominium. The architect who designed the 1980s era conversion won many awards. Photograph by David W. Lewis.

The former Redpath Sugar Foundry in Point Saint-Charles is now a condominium.

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Preservation, rehabilitation, and interpretation as agents of transformation along the New York canal system

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Editor’s note: This is the sixth in a series of posts on deindustrialization and industrial heritage commissioned by The Public Historian, expanding the conversation begun with the November 2017 special issue on the topic.

The Erie Canal system. Courtesy of the Erie Canalway National Heritage Corridor.

The Erie Canal system. Image credit: Erie Canalway National Heritage Corridor.

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Yoga among the ruins? The challenges of industrial heritage in postwar Pittsburgh

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Editor’s note: This is the third in a series of posts on deindustrialization and industrial heritage commissioned by The Public Historian, expanding the conversation begun with the November 2017 special issue on the topic. 

Downtown Pittsburgh and the Duquesne Incline from Mount Washington.

Downtown Pittsburgh and the Duquesne Incline from Mount Washington.

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Rust, recreation, and reflection

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Editor’s note: We publish TPH editor James F. Brooks’s introduction to the November 2017 issue of The Public Historian. The entire issue is available online to National Council on Public History members.

I recently spent several weeks exploring the remnants of coal towns in southern Colorado, as well as associated public history interpretive sites like the United Mine Workers’ (UMW) memorial at the site of the Ludlow Massacre, the Walsenberg Coal Mining Museum, the Cokedale Mining Museum, and the Steelworks Center of the West in Pueblo. Read More

Stronger than steel: class and commemoration in postindustrial Nova Scotia

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Editor’s note: This is the fifth in a series of posts on deindustrialization and industrial heritage commissioned by The Public Historian, expanding the conversation begun with the November 2017 special issue on the topic.

Cape Breton, by NASA NASA Landsat, via Wikimedia Commons

Cape Breton. Image credit: NASA Landsat via Wikimedia Commons

In the late nineteenth century, Cape Breton, the island on Canada’s east coast at the northern tip of the province of Nova Scotia, was rich in coal and ripe for resource extraction. Read More