Tag Archive

The Public Historian

Rust, recreation, and reflection

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Editor’s note: We publish TPH editor James F. Brooks’s introduction to the November 2017 issue of The Public Historian. The entire issue is available online to National Council on Public History members.

I recently spent several weeks exploring the remnants of coal towns in southern Colorado, as well as associated public history interpretive sites like the United Mine Workers’ (UMW) memorial at the site of the Ludlow Massacre, the Walsenberg Coal Mining Museum, the Cokedale Mining Museum, and the Steelworks Center of the West in Pueblo. Read More

“A Shared Inquiry into Shared Inquiry” in the public history classroom

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Display from St. Louis in the Gilded Age Exhibit, Missouri History Museum, curated by Katherine T. Corbett, St. Louis, Missouri, 1994. Courtesy of the Missouri Historical Society, St. Louis.

Display from “St. Louis in the Gilded Age” exhibit, Missouri History Museum, curated by Katherine T. Corbett, St. Louis, Missouri, 1994. Photo credit: Missouri Historical Society, St. Louis.

When Tammy Gaskell posted to the [email protected]ork blog asking public history educators to recommend articles from The Public Historian that work well in the classroom, I immediately replied with several options. Read More

Monumental moments

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George Washington Custis Lee, on horseback, with staff in Richmond, Virgina, at the unveiling of a monument to Jefferson Davis, in June 1907. Photo credit: Library of Congress, Reproduction Number: LC-USZ62-58277. Photograph by Edyth Carter Beveridge.

On Monday, August 14, roped and yanked from its pedestal by people angered by the violence that unfolded the preceding night in Charlottesville, Virginia, a statue commemorating “THE BOYS WHO WORE THE GRAY” lay crumpled on the lawn before the old courthouse in Durham, North Carolina.  Read More

Paneriai, Poland, and “Public History and the Study of Memory”

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Exploring the historic and current landscape at Paneriai, outside Vilnius. (Photo courtesy of the author)

Exploring the historic and current landscape at Paneriai, outside Vilnius. Image credit: Aaron Shapiro

I find The Public Historian indispensable not only for keeping up with the field but also for introducing students to public history scholarship. And while I regularly assign more recent articles, I often return to David Glassberg’s “Public History and the Study of Memory” (vol. Read More

A vexing issue

Editor’s note: We publish TPH editor James F. Brooks’s introduction to the August 2017 issue of The Public Historian. The entire issue is available online to National Council on Public History members.

At first glance, a collection of essays that range from Jesuit Mission historic sites to faux Indian statuary to Liberty ships and war museums seem impossible to arrange in a conceptual matrix—at once evidence of the great range of public history engagements and, simultaneously, a scattershot deployment of their substance. Read More