Tag Archive

The Public Historian

Neon City: Power lines and plundered lands

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I hope NCPH members and The Public Historian subscribers will enjoy our second foray into digital special editions tuned to the current moment in public history. Our Monuments, Memory, Politics, and Our Publics issue of last September responded to public debates around the removal of “Lost Cause” monuments then in the news. Read More

Public health and public history: Rapid response to the Ebola crisis

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Editor’s note: This is the second post of a series that continues the conversation begun in the February 2018 issue of The Public Historian with the roundtable “Responding Rapidly to Our Communities.”

Felicia, a 29-year-old Liberian nurse, prepares to go inside the Ebola patient ward to draw blood from confirmed patients in Bong County, Liberia on October 9, 2014. Photograph by Morgana Wingard, courtesy USAID

Felicia, a 29-year-old Liberian nurse, prepares to go inside the Ebola patient ward to draw blood from confirmed patients in Bong County, Liberia on October 9, 2014.

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TPH turns forty

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Editor’s note: We publish TPH editor James F. Brooks’s introduction to the February 2018 issue of The Public Historian. The entire issue is available online to National Council on Public History members.

Forty years ago, G. Wesley Johnson, a historian of colonial West Africa, penned the first of what would become scores of Editor’s Corners (at the time, “Editor’s Prefaces”) to launch the first issue of The Public Historian. Read More

Engaging contested memory in the classroom

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Editor’s note: In this latest post in our series on teaching with articles from The Public Historian, Professor Lara Kelland and MA student Sarah McCoy discuss their respective experiences using Christine Rieser Robbins and Mark W. Robbins’s essay, “Engaging the Contested Memory of the Public Square: Community Collaboration, Archaeology, and Oral History at Corpus Christi’s Artesian Park” (The Public Historian 36, no. Read More

Industrial heritage as agent of gentrification

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Editor’s note: This is the final post in a series on deindustrialization and industrial heritage commissioned by “The Public Historian,” expanding the conversation begun with the November 2017 special issue on the topic.

The former Redpath Sugar Foundry in Point Saint-Charles is now a condominium. The architect who designed the 1980s era conversion won many awards. Photograph by David W. Lewis.

The former Redpath Sugar Foundry in Point Saint-Charles is now a condominium.

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Preservation, rehabilitation, and interpretation as agents of transformation along the New York canal system

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Editor’s note: This is the sixth in a series of posts on deindustrialization and industrial heritage commissioned by The Public Historian, expanding the conversation begun with the November 2017 special issue on the topic.

The Erie Canal system. Courtesy of the Erie Canalway National Heritage Corridor.

The Erie Canal system. Image credit: Erie Canalway National Heritage Corridor.

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Over-the-hill canes and ideal bodies: teaching disability history as public history

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Editor’s note: The post is the sixth in a series commissioned by The Public Historian that focuses on essays published in TPH that have been used effectively in the classroom. We welcome comments and further suggestions! If you have a TPH article that is a favorite in your classroom, please let us know. Read More

Five ways we can do better to respond to crises in our communities

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Editor’s note: This is the first post of a series that continues the conversation begun in the February 2018 issue of The Public Historian with the roundtable “Responding Rapidly to Our Communities.”

A sign made by a resident of Newtown, Connecticut, following the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting in 2012. Source: The Story of the Stuff.

A sign made by a resident of Newtown, Connecticut, following the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting in 2012.

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