Tag Archive

public engagement

Creative nonfiction as public history: a Q&A with author Miles Harvey

, , , , , ,

Editor’s Note: Miles Harvey is author of The King of Confidence, A Tale of Utopian Dreamers, Frontier Schemers, True Believers, False Prophets, and the Murder of an American Monarch, which tells the story of James Jesse Strang, a 19th-century con man, who—as a self-proclaimed prophet and king of the universe—led a sect of the Mormon faith called the Strangites. Read More

Bringing History Indoors during a Pandemic

, , , ,

Editor’s note:  How have local communities interacted with historians during the time of the COVID-19 pandemic? This post introduces the History Indoors project by two graduate students at the University of Essex. History Indoors helps bring a wide array of historical topics to a general audience around the UK and the world. Read More

Ride or Die: the “Oregon Trail Live” Q&A

, , , , , , , , , , , ,

 

Editor’s Note: Today we welcome Michael Salgarolo and Kylie Holloway to discuss their Oregon Trail immersive game that brought history and leisure together as a way to experience the US West and challenge the colonial foundations of the famous video game. Read More

Riding the 1919 Chicago Race riots: biking across divides to confront the past

, , , , , , , ,

Editor’s note: This essay is part of a series of reflective posts written by winners of awards intended to be given out at the NCPH 2020 annual meeting in Atlanta, Georgia. The Chicago 1919 Project, organized by the Newberry Library, was the 2020 recipient of the Outstanding Public History Project Award. Read More

A Virtual Walking Tour in Decatur, Georgia: Linking Race, History, Community

, , , , , , , ,

I teach a seminar on ethnography and community engagement in Goucher College’s graduate historic preservation program. Last year, I took my students to Baltimore’s Otterbein neighborhood, a historic district and one of the nation’s earliest urban homesteading neighborhoods.[i] The COVID-19 pandemic pushed our summer term online and that meant no class field trip to Baltimore, an annual program tradition. Read More

“What Could It Have [Been] Then?”: Reflecting on the origins and historiography of a plantation historic site

, , , , , , , , ,

A big house. Stately trees. Curious outbuildings. In 1905, Pennsylvania-born tourist Matilda Kessinger marveled at the landscape before her, “something one always reads about but never sees.” After 18 years of traveling the South, Kessinger had finally found the one place that lived up to her romantic ideals of an antebellum plantation. Read More

Managing social media, doing public history

, , , , ,

This summer, a team of National Council on Preservation Education (NCPE) interns oversaw the National Historic Landmarks Program’s social media accounts and explored firsthand how the creative chaos of shared social media management can be harnessed as a productive outlet for engagement and interpretation. Read More

Excavating subterranean histories of Ringwood Mines and the Ramapough Lunaape Nation, part 2

, , , , , , , , , ,

Editor’s note: this is the second in a two-part series. Part 1 was published on November 28, 2019.

I first visited Ringwood, New Jersey, in February of 2018 with a group of fifteen students enrolled in my design studio class at Rutgers University’s department of landscape architecture. Read More

Excavating subterranean histories of Ringwood Mines and the Ramapough Lunaape Nation, part 1

, , , , , ,

The Ramapough Lunaape Turtle Clan have called Ringwood, New Jersey, home for centuries. The surrounding landscape features iron mines, Native American rock shelters, and a forest that provides food for hunters and foragers. But it also contains a stew of different chemical toxicants from the former Ford manufacturing plant, deep pockets of contaminated soil, streams that now flow with orange water, and the Ringwood Mines/Landfill Superfund Site. Read More