Tag Archive

education

Teaching the digital self

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“Don’t include images because they slow everything down too much.” “Use tables and frames to organize your website.” “Visual interface is more important than content.” “Flash will save the internet.” “No one wants to read or watch videos on their tiny little phone.” “Use the brightest colors possible.” All of these statements had their axiomatic moment, but with the advantage of technological hindsight, these ideas seem archaic, though they are thirty years old at most. Read More

Notes from the field: The University of Wrocław’s Public History Summer School

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Author’s Note: Last month, I had the pleasure of attending the Public History Summer School, held in Wroclaw, Poland. The Summer School, which was co-sponsored with the University of Wrocław’s Historical Institute, the local Zajezdnia History Centre, the Jean Monnet Network for Applied Contemporary European History, and the International Federation for Public History (IFPH), ran for four days, and included presentations from scholars all over Europe and beyond. Read More

Advocating for archivists

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On July 29, 2018, The Chronicle of Higher Education published a piece by Alice Dreger entitled “The Delicate Art of Dealing with Your Archivist” (originally behind a paywall, the article is now publicly accessible). In the article, Dreger, a historian of science and medicine, breaks down the types of archivists a researcher may encounter by a “basic taxonomy.” Read More

Clicking is Learning? Musings on Crafting a Holistic Digital History Pedagogy

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“Click here. Click once more. And once more…” As an educational technologist at an undergraduate liberal arts college, I hear these words frequently. I often call on my skills as a public historian when it comes to solving problems related to digital pedagogies and understanding the context of technology in the classroom and beyond. Read More

Campus history as public history: Interpreting slavery through historical walking tours

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Can campus history be public history? NCPH members and others, both inside and outside of the academy, have been grappling with this question for years, considering the often-fraught town/gown and faculty/administration relationships many of our colleagues face. The ways that we answer this question have changed significantly over the last decade, however, as dozens of colleges and universities have endeavored to reckon with the reality of their histories, many in response to institutional connections to slavery. Read More

Exploring approaches to civic engagement through “Kitchen Conversations”

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Editor’s note: In this final post in our series on teaching with articles from The Public Historian, Kate Wilson discusses her experiences using Ruth Abram’s essay, “Kitchen Conversations: Democracy in Action at the Lower East Side Tenement Museum” (The Public Historian 29, no. Read More

Summer exchange program: International collaboration in public history

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“What I would like to see in the future is more of an emphasis on cooperation between museums in the international community. In an increasingly connected world, it only serves [to] the benefit of the American public history sector to create bridges with other institutions.”

The above statement is excerpted from the blog I kept during graduate school where I sought to answer the prompt: “The Future of Public History—Where is it Going?” I spent much of my time as a public history student curious about collaborative public history work done across international lines. Read More

Scratch the surface and women’s history is everywhere in Las Vegas

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Editor’s note: This is the final post in a series of pieces focused on Las Vegas and its regional identity which were posted before and during the NCPH Annual Meeting in Las Vegas in April. 

The casino and entertainment industries in Las Vegas have used women’s bodies to sell the city since the 1950s. Read More

Terra incognita: Navigating life as the only professionally-trained historian at work

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There’s a gap between intellectually understanding something and actually grasping it and all of its ramifications. Two days into my new job in 2014, I fell headlong into that yawning space between intellectual understanding and grasping and spent the next few months scraping my knees and elbows clambering back out again. Read More