Tag Archive

rapid response

Places of Refuge, Keepers of Memory

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Editor’s note: This is the final post of a series that continues the conversation begun in the February 2018 issue of The Public Historian with the roundtable “Responding Rapidly to Our Communities.”

In 2018, tragedy is visible, impossible to ignore, and happening all the time and all across the globe as [email protected]’s series of posts and The Public Historian’s roundtable have so deftly illuminated. Read More

Making meaning from ashes—the development of the Victorian Bushfires Collection

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Editor’s note: This is the fifth post of a series that continues the conversation begun in the February 2018 issue of The Public Historian with the roundtable “Responding Rapidly to Our Communities.”

The Black Saturday Bushfires are the worst natural disaster in Australia’s recorded history. Read More

Archiving the 1 October web

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Editor’s note: This is the fourth post of a series that continues the conversation begun in the February 2018 issue of The Public Historian with the roundtable “Responding Rapidly to Our Communities.”

Tragedy struck Las Vegas, Nevada on October 1, 2017, when a gunman opened fire onto a crowd of twenty-two thousand people attending the Route 91 Harvest Festival, injuring over five hundred people and killing fifty-eight. Read More

The accidental web archive: The Tragedy at Virginia Tech Collection

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Editor’s note: This is the third post of a series that continues the conversation begun in the February 2018 issue of The Public Historian with the roundtable “Responding Rapidly to Our Communities.”

Eleven years ago, Seung Hui Cho killed thirty-two people and injured at least seventeen others before turning the gun on himself.  Read More

Public health and public history: Rapid response to the Ebola crisis

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Editor’s note: This is the second post of a series that continues the conversation begun in the February 2018 issue of The Public Historian with the roundtable “Responding Rapidly to Our Communities.”

As curator of the David J. Sencer CDC Museum, I collect, present, and interpret the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s history. Read More

Five ways we can do better to respond to crises in our communities

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Editor’s note: This is the first post of a series that continues the conversation begun in the February 2018 issue of The Public Historian with the roundtable “Responding Rapidly to Our Communities.”

When the Virginia Tech tragedy took place in April 2007, I was an adjunct at Virginia Tech (VT) and the general manager of an art house movie theater that touted itself as the “heart of Blacksburg”—located just steps from the Drillfield, VT’s version of a quad. Read More