Tag Archive

methods

Discovering activism and advocacy in historic preservation through my grandparents’ furniture

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Editor’s Note: This post is part of a series of reflections from winners of NCPH awards in 2021. Jacqueline Patrice Hudson is the winner of the NCPH new professional award.

As a young child, I thought visiting my grandparents in Chicago was a fun adventure each summer when my younger sister Jephreda and I got the chance to ride a plane by ourselves (accompanied by an airline employee, of course). Read More

College on the Move Q&A: A living and public history trip through the Southeast

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Editor’s Note: How can students get valuable study abroad experience at home? John R. Legg, an Affiliate Editor with [email protected] and PhD student at George Mason University, interviews Dr. Niels Eichhorn about a public history-oriented domestic study trip that introduced students to American Revolution, Civil War, and Civil Rights-era historical sites around the Southeast. Read More

The Art of (virtual) gathering: Considering audiences with purpose and intention

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For the last fifteen years I have worked as a public history digital content creator. Much of my work has been learned on the job as I engage with the tools and technologies of multi-disciplinary storytelling—and more recently, consider how technology facilitates community engagement with history in both public and intimate settings. Read More

Creative nonfiction as public history: a Q&A with author Miles Harvey

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Editor’s Note: Miles Harvey is author of The King of Confidence, A Tale of Utopian Dreamers, Frontier Schemers, True Believers, False Prophets, and the Murder of an American Monarch, which tells the story of James Jesse Strang, a 19th-century con man, who—as a self-proclaimed prophet and king of the universe—led a sect of the Mormon faith called the Strangites. Read More

Making Public History More Accessible During Times of Uncertainty

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The COVID-19 pandemic of 2020 is as good a time as ever for every museum and historic site to devise strategies to make public history more accessible. For public historians—as with many other industries related to travel and tourism—this year has been filled with chaos, uncertainty, prolonged furloughs, and unemployment. Read More

Ride or Die: the “Oregon Trail Live” Q&A

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Editor’s Note: Today we welcome Michael Salgarolo and Kylie Holloway to discuss their Oregon Trail immersive game that brought history and leisure together as a way to experience the US West and challenge the colonial foundations of the famous video game. Read More

Riding the 1919 Chicago Race riots: biking across divides to confront the past

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Editor’s note: This essay is part of a series of reflective posts written by winners of awards intended to be given out at the NCPH 2020 annual meeting in Atlanta, Georgia. The Chicago 1919 Project, organized by the Newberry Library, was the 2020 recipient of the Outstanding Public History Project Award. Read More

Teaching Public History Online: A Report From This Summer’s Working Group

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Editors’ Note: This post from the facilitators of the NCPH Teaching Public History Online Working Group summarizes the group’s efforts to develop best practices and lesson plans for teaching public history online during the COVID-19 pandemic. For more information on the working group and the materials they developed, go here Read More

Reflecting on the Georgia Incarceration Performance Project

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Editor’s note: This essay is part of a series of reflective posts written by winners of awards intended to be given out at the NCPH 2020 annual meeting in Atlanta, Georgia. Jan Levinson-Hebbard of the Hargrett Rare Book and Manuscript Library at the University of Georgia received an honorable mention for the Outstanding Public History Project Award. Read More