Tag Archive

profession

Advocating for archivists

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On July 29, 2018, The Chronicle of Higher Education published a piece by Alice Dreger entitled “The Delicate Art of Dealing with Your Archivist” (originally behind a paywall, the article is now publicly accessible). In the article, Dreger, a historian of science and medicine, breaks down the types of archivists a researcher may encounter by a “basic taxonomy.” Read More

Study the humanities: Help us make the case

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Editor’s note: This piece from the National Humanities Alliance is being circulated in a variety of relevant venues.

Think pieces abound on how best to make the case for the value of studying the humanities—should we as a humanities community emphasize the quite respectable career and salary outcomes of humanities majors or do we then fall into the trap of suggesting that higher education is necessary only for economic gain? Read More

How a Pennsylvania gal fell in love with Nevada

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Editor’s note: This is the fourth in a series of pieces  focused on Las Vegas and its regional identity which will be posted before and during the NCPH Annual Meeting in Las Vegas in April.

I grew up scouring the grasses around the Juniata River for arrowheads and I hunted down second-hand fur coats in every rusty, steel town in western Pennsylvania. Read More

Does it count? Promotion, tenure, and evaluation of public history scholarship

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Whenever public historians first began working in academic units, it is likely that soon after, their peers questioned whether public history scholarship—exhibitions, class projects, and reports—counted toward tenure. “Count” is academic shorthand for work that is considered to be scholarship or research. Read More

On unpaid internships, professional ethical standards, and the NCPH jobs page

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In the last month, our jobs page has garnered nearly 20,000 page views, making it one of the most-visited pages on the NCPH website. We don’t limit access to the page to NCPH members and we don’t charge employers to post jobs, because we think it benefits everyone in the field to connect qualified job-searchers with as many public history job opportunities as possible. Read More