Tag Archive

community history

The making of James Madison’s Montpelier’s “The Mere Distinction of Colour” Q&A: Part 4

, , , , , , , , , , , ,

Editor’s Note: Want to know more about what it takes to develop an award-winning exhibition about the lives of enslaved people at a founding father’s historic site? We did, too! In this series, we will learn more about what went into the new permanent exhibition The Mere Distinction of Colour (MDOC) at James Madison’s Montpelier (JMM) in Virginia. Read More

The making of James Madison’s Montpelier’s “The Mere Distinction of Colour” Q&A: Part 3

, , , , , , , , , , , ,

Editor’s Note: Want to know more about what it takes to develop an award-winning exhibition about the lives of enslaved people at a founding father’s historic site? We did, too! In this series, we will learn more about what went into the new permanent exhibition The Mere Distinction of Colour (MDOC) at James Madison’s Montpelier (JMM) in Virginia. Read More

The making of James Madison’s Montpelier’s “The Mere Distinction of Colour” Q&A: Part 2

, , , , , , , , , , , ,

Editor’s Note: Want to know more about what it takes to develop an award-winning exhibition about the lives of enslaved people at a founding father’s historic site? We did, too! In this series, we will learn more about what went into the new permanent exhibition The Mere Distinction of Colour (MDOC) at James Madison’s Montpelier (JMM) in Virginia. Read More

Working with competing histories

, , ,

As historians working in the field, consultants often see value in objects, buildings, landscapes, and locations that may be overlooked by the general public. Living in a community, people can pass a place daily without knowing anything about its history. Or they may have heard the cursory basics—facts that tie it to a major person or event in the town or region. Read More

The making of James Madison’s Montpelier’s “The Mere Distinction of Colour” Q&A: Part 1

, , , , , , , , , , , ,

Editor’s Note: Want to know more about what it takes to develop an award-winning exhibition about the lives of enslaved people at a founding father’s historic site? We did, too! In this series, we will learn more about what went into the new permanent exhibition “The Mere Distinction of Colour” (MDOC) at James Madison’s Montpelier (JMM) in Virginia. Read More

A different “birthright”: Exploring immigrant history in the birthplace of “America’s Immigrant Problem”

, , , , ,

In recent years, the debate over immigration and migration to the United States has been especially pronounced, with calls to end “invasions” of “illegal immigrants” from Latin America, build a border wall, institute a “Muslim travel ban,” refuse refugees seeking asylum, and rescind birthright citizenship.  Read More

War Stories, History Harvests, and how we learned to adapt on the fly

, , , ,

War Stories is an NEH grant-funded project that preserves the experiences of West Texas U.S. military veterans and their family members by digitizing documents and objects as well as conducting oral history interviews. Housed in the Angelo State University history department, the project is a collaboration between faculty, students, and community members. Read More

Touring with Empire Logistics Group

, , , , , , , ,

Editor’s note: This post continues a series featuring contributions from members of the NCPH Board of Directors.

Lately I’ve been performing my public history. Several times this spring I’ve donned a business suit and silk blouse, straightened my blonde(ish) hair, and adopted the cheerful demeanor of a corporate publicist. Read More

Editors’ conversation on interpreting immigration, Part 1

, , , , , , ,

Editors’ Note: Four years ago, outgoing NCPH president Bob Weyeneth called on public historians to “pull back the curtain” on their process. Turning topics of contemporary relevance into public history involves numerous collegial conversations which usually remain behind the scenes. The [email protected] editors thought our readers might be interested in the following conversation prompted by Adina Langer’s development of a new exhibition at the Museum of History and Holocaust Education at Kennesaw State University. Read More