Tag Archive


Statues, national monuments, and settler-colonialism: Connections between public history and policy in the wake of Bears Ears and Grand Staircase-Escalante

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Boston Founders Memorial. In the scene William Blackstone, the first settler of Boston, is greeting John Winthrop, the first governor of the Massachusetts Bay Colony. Native Americans watch the scene, which includes Ann Pollard, the first white woman to land in Boston.

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My community’s history is racist. How can I correct it?

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Silver Spring “Memory Wall” mural depicting the B&O Railroad station, c. 1940s. Photo credit: David Rotenstein.

This is an exciting and anxiety-producing moment in the United States. It is a time when professional historians are stepping outside their classrooms and consulting practices to push for the removal of Confederate statues and for greater public dialogue about the roles that white supremacy played in the past and how it persists in our communities. Read More

Reimagining the history of the (Inter)National Park Service

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National Park Service logo. Image credit: Wikimedia Commons

On May 13, 1918, less than two years after the National Park Service (NPS) was established, U.S. Interior Secretary Franklin K. Lane wrote to first National Park Service (NPS) director Stephen T. Mather regarding ways in which the new federal agency could interpret and expand its mission. Read More

Campus Carry and the public history of the gun debate

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Green indicates states with mandatory campus carry laws; yellow indicates states with institutional laws; and red indicates states where guns are never allowed on campuses. Image credit: Theshibboleth and terrorist96 via Wikimedia Commons

In July of this year, Georgia became the tenth state to prohibit public colleges and universities from banning concealed weapons on campus for permit holders. Read More