Tag Archive

Imperiled Promise

Remembering Aidan Smith

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Aidan Smith (far right) at the launch of the Carl Sandburg Home National Historic Site project, 2016. Image courtesy Anne Mitchell Whisnant

Our encounter in the hotel lobby on the final day of the Las Vegas NCPH conference was brief—one of those “darn, we missed each other!” moments of a busy event filled with valued but too-rarely seen colleagues. Read More

Collegial questioning: A new forum on history in the US National Park Service (Part 3)

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Continued from Part 1 and Part 2.

fort and ocean

Fort Jefferson at Dry Tortugas National Park, Key West, Florida. Photo credit: Matthew Paulson.

~ Christine Arato, Chief Historian, National Park Service, Northeast Region

After Imperiled Promise landed with something of a magnificent thud almost two years ago, I liken the NPS response to a progression along the five stages of grief articulated by Swiss psychiatrist Elizabeth Kübler-Ross in 1969: denial, anger, bargaining, depression, and finally acceptance. Read More

Collegial questioning: A new forum on history in the US National Park Service (Part 2)

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fence with sign

Signs at Sand Creek Massacre National Historic Site, Colorado. Photo credit: howderfamily.com.

Continued from Part 1

~ Seth Bruggeman, Associate Professor of History and Director, Center for Public History, Temple University

I’ve been fortunate to have had several points of contact with the Imperiled Promise report since its release, from attending early conference sessions with its authors to being a conversation facilitator myself and, most recently, speaking about where it may lead the NPS’s history program.  Read More

Collegial questioning: A new forum on history in the US National Park Service (Part 1)

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Editor’s Note:  On November 6, 2013, the Mid-Atlantic Regional Center for the Humanities (MARCH) at Rutgers University-Camden convened a public forum to explore the changing presentation of history in US national parks.  The gathering took as its starting point the 2011 report “Imperiled Promise: The State of History in the National Parks,” which has sparked other similar conversations over the past year and a half (for example, this one a year ago in Boston). Read More

NCPH 2013 Group Consulting Award (Part 2): Synergies and cross-purposes

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report coverEditors’ Note:  This series showcases the winners of the National Council on Public History’s annual awards for the best new work in the field.  Today’s post is the second in a two-part series by Marla Miller and Anne Whisnant, two of the four authors of Imperiled Promise: The State of History in the National Park Service, winner of the 2013 NCPH Excellence in Consulting Award in the group category. Read More

NCPH 2013 Group Consulting Award (Part 1): What next for Imperiled Promise?

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report coverEditors’ Note:  This series showcases the winners of the National Council on Public History’s annual awards for the best new work in the field.  Today’s post is part of a two-part series by Marla Miller and Anne Whisnant, two of the four authors of Imperiled Promise: The State of History in the National Park Service, winner of the 2013 NCPH Excellence in Consulting Award in the group category. Read More

Refining the republic: A discussion on history in the National Park Service

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report coverLast Friday, November 2, 2012, National Park Service personnel, public historians, academics, and graduate students from the Northeast met at the Massachusetts State Archives in Boston to discuss the Organization of American Historians’ recent report Imperiled Promise: The State of History in the National Park Service (2011). Read More

A seasonal ranger ponders "The State of History in the National Park Service"

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report coverThe NCPH/OAH conference brought to light a subject near to my heart this afternoon – history in the NPS.  The panel consisted of Marla Miller, Gary Nash, David Thelen and Anne Mitchell Whisnant.  On the docket was the discussion of their report on how the NPS stacks up in the history department.  Read More