Tag Archive

preservation

Pennsylvania’s hallowed ground: A role for historic preservation

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Memorial Day ceremony, Midland Cemetery, Midland, PA, 2013. Photo credit: Brenda Barrett.

Memorial Day ceremony, Midland Cemetery, Midland, PA, 2013. Photo credit: Brenda Barrett

Editor’s note: This post continues a series commemorating the anniversary of the National Historic Preservation Act by examining a past article published in The Public Historian, describing its significance and relating it to contemporary conversations in historic preservation.  Read More

Engaging to preserve: Building a preservation-minded community through Twitter

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Phenix Building. Photo credit: Caroline Nye Stevens.

Phenix Building, Providence, RI. Photo credit: Caroline Nye Stevens

Over the course of ten weeks this past spring, I explored, blogged, and tweeted my way through twenty of Providence’s endangered properties. The challenge came to me by way of the Providence Preservation Society (PPS), which is celebrating the twentieth anniversary of their Most Endangered Properties (MEP) program this year. Read More

Trashy history: Infrastructure as historic property

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Editor’s note: This post continues a series commemorating the anniversary of the National Historic Preservation Act by examining a past article published in The Public Historian, describing its significance and relating it to contemporary conversations in historic preservation. 

United Irrigation District Canal, Mission, Texas (photograph courtesy Texas Dept. of Transportation)

United Irrigation District Canal, Mission, Texas. 

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No mere morality play: Why we need Confederate memorials now more than ever

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Editor’s note: This is the first in a series of posts addressing recent debates over Confederate memory and symbolism in the wake of the shooting of nine parishioners at Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in downtown Charleston, South Carolina.

St. Paul's Episcopal Church in Richmond, Virginia. Photo credit: Doug Kerr. Wikimedia Commons.

St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in Richmond, Virginia.

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The fifty-year stumbling block

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Editor’s note: This post continues a series commemorating the anniversary of the National Historic Preservation Act by examining a past article published in The Public Historian, describing its significance and relating it to contemporary conversations in historic preservation. 

The Beauvoir Estate, the home of Jefferson Davis, president of the Confederacy, seven months after suffering damage during Hurricane Katrina. Source: FEMA

The Beauvoir Estate, the home of Jefferson Davis, president of the Confederacy, seven months after suffering damage during Hurricane Katrina. 

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Continuing the conversation about preservation and climate change

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waves and shore

Aftermath of Hurricane Ernesto near Newport, Rhode Island, 2006. Photo credit: duluoz cats on Flickr

Newporters like to boast that their city is home to the largest concentration of American buildings pre-dating 1800. It’s a hard claim to verify, but tallies aside, the City-by-the-Sea in Rhode Island is undoubtedly a patchwork of architectural delights reflecting its history as a powerful colonial entrepôt, a Gilded Age resort, a naval base, and currently a vibrant tourist destination. Read More

Historic preservation shines a light on a dark past

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Trinity High School demolition, 2013. Photo credit: David Rotenstein

Trinity High School demolition, 2013. Photo credit: David Rotenstein

Editor’s note: This post continues a series commemorating the anniversary of the National Historic Preservation Act by examining a past article published in The Public Historian, describing its significance and relating it to contemporary conversations in historic preservation.  Read More

Robert M. Utley: Founder of the National Historic Preservation Program

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 Editor’s note: This post continues a series commemorating the anniversary of the National Historic Preservation Act by examining a past article published in The Public Historian, describing its significance and relating it to contemporary conversations in historic preservation.

Robert M. Utley (third from right) as a panelist at the Denver "New Preservation" conference, 1968.  The National Park Service held eight regional conferences to explain the National Historic Preservation Act and its broad implications for preservation to the new State Liaison Officers for the act and interested members of the public.   Image credit:   Washington Office, National Park Service.

Robert M.

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