Tag Archive

Radical Roots

Disrupting authority: The radical roots and branches of oral history

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William Colbert of Alabama, ca. 1936. Born in slavery, Colbert was interviewed by the Federal Writers’ Project. Photo credit: Library of Congress

Oral history, like public history, is now old enough to have its own history, its own founding narrative. As one might expect from a field so deeply devoted to challenging incomplete and exclusive narratives, oral historians are now asking what is left out of their own history and filling in some of the gaps they have found. Read More

Public history in the classroom

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Sharing Stories: College students and teens dialoging at the community center.” Photo credit: Elizabeth Belanger

Over the past weeks my project colleagues have provided glimpses into public history’s “Radical Roots.” In these posts, key figures and sites have emerged: Gene Weltfish at the American Civilization Institute of Morristown, the campers and counselors at Camp Woodland , and Louis Jones at Cooperstown Graduate Program Read More

Broadening our understanding of the roots of public history education

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Camp Woodland Photo Credit: SUNY Albany Archives

How closely is public history tied to academic history? Judging by the historiography of public history, it would seem that the answer to that is “very”; after all, the generally accepted view is that the field came into its own in the 1970s directed by formally trained academic historians. Read More