Tag Archive

profession

Ask a public historian: Paul Chaat Smith

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Photo credit: NMAI Photo Services, Smithsonian Institution

Paul Chaat Smith joined the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian in 2001, where he currently serves as associate curator. With Robert Warrior, he is the author of Like a Hurricane: The Indian Movement from Alcatraz to Wounded Knee (New Press, 1996), a standard text in Native Studies and American history courses. Read More

How historians work

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“History”  Photo credit Blacren

Historians often remark that we need to do a better job of letting others in on the ways we explore and understand the past. (That was the impetus for a thought-provoking series from The Public Historian and [email protected] a couple of years ago.) In a time when “alternate facts,” outright fabrications, and diametrically opposed versions of reality shape the American political landscape as perhaps seldom before, that task seems all the more urgent. Read More

The Careers in History Symposium: An NCPH Mini-Con

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Participants in the Networking Lightning Round during the Careers in History Symposium hosted by Indiana University–Purdue University Indianapolis. Photo credit: IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI

On Saturday, November 12, 2016 the National Council on Public History (NCPH) and the Indiana University–Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI) Public History MA program hosted over one hundred students and faculty from seven states in Indianapolis for our biennial Careers in History Symposium. Read More

Top five posts of 2016

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reed-hamilton-screen-shotAs we mark the end of a tumultuous 2016 and begin what promises to be an eventful new year, [email protected]’s editors are reflecting on the posts that prompted the widest readership and dialogue among our community:

Annette Gordon Reed, Hamilton the Musical: Blacks and the Founding Fathers

Matthew Exline, Looking for a Job in Public History: An Outsider’s Perspective

Cathy Stanton, Does the National Park Service have a Culture Problem? Read More

Mass collaboration and historical synthesis in “The American Yawp”

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American Yawp home page. Screenshot courtesy Joseph Locke

“The American Yawp” home page. Screenshot courtesy Joseph Locke

The American Yawp, the profession’s first multi-authored open textbook, contains thirty chapters and almost 300,000 words. It covers everything from indigenous creation stories to Instagram. How, with historical input accelerating and the scope of scholarship expanding, could any individual or small group of historians hope to capture the breadth of American history and to do so as expansively as a textbook demands? Read More

Out of the academy and into public service: Changing expectations and new measures of success

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Emily McEwen as resource specialist, April 2015. Photo credit: Emily McEwen

In June 2014, when I finished my PhD in history, with a research emphasis in public history, I thought I was pretty hot stuff. And rightfully so. I had worked for eight long years slogging through coursework, exams, conference presentations, fellowship applications, TAships, a year of research, and a solid year and a half of dissertation writing to achieve my goal. Read More

Whither diversity?

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NCPH Diversity Task Force logo. Image credit: Kesha Bruce

NCPH Diversity Task Force logo. Image credit: Kesha Bruce

Ask people what diversity within an organization or institution means and you’ll get many answers–responses so disparate, you wonder how anyone can identify a common thread or focus.

In 2015, the National Council on Public History created a Diversity Task Force to address the paucity of professionals of color engaged in public history in general and NCPH in particular. Read More